Image of cracked brown concrete.

Leveling a concrete floor can seem like an easy task, something you can DIY over a weekend, but our concrete floor leveling experts know that doing it well is much more complicated than you think! While we always recommend calling in an expert concrete contractor from A-1 Concrete Leveling and Foundation Repair in Nashville for concrete floor leveling, we also know that you may want to give it a go on your own. That’s why in today’s blog post we’re sharing some tips from the pros on how to level a concrete floor. Continue reading to learn more, and if things don’t end up working out, keep our contact info on hand!

Can My Concrete Be Leveled?

Concrete, despite being one of the most durable building materials, does eventually deteriorate over time, especially if it’s not properly maintained. If your concrete is old and has many cracks, concrete leveling may not be the best option for you. Instead, you may need concrete replacement or concrete resurfacing. 

Concrete Floor Leveling Options

If you are able to repair your floor, here are a few things you can try on your own.

Surface Skim Coat

This is a great option for when the subsurface of your concrete is stable but the surface is uneven. It involves using a self-leveling compound or thinned cement, poured over the existing surface. While this option doesn’t do much to solve the underlying problems, it can be a good option for concrete floor leveling before putting another type of flooring on top. You should know that this material isn’t as strong or long-lasting as concrete, and probably not the best option for a concrete slab like a patio or garage.

Grinding

This is a last-resort option for concrete leveling, as it doesn’t really level the concrete, but instead smooths out joints. The option damages the surface, which can lead to damage from the elements down the road. However, it is a good short-term solution for large, uneven pieces of concrete that may have been pushed up by tree roots. 

Concrete Slab Leveling

In most cases, concrete floor leveling is the best option, since it gets to the underlying issues of the concrete rather than just the surface. It also lasts much longer than other concrete repair options.

Concrete Floor Leveling

Concrete floor leveling isn’t typically something you can do for yourself, since it involves equipment and experience. However, it is cheaper than you might think — and much more affordable than replacing your concrete. Concrete leveling can be used on all sorts of surfaces, including for concrete driveway repair. Here’s how we do it:

Drill holes in strategic locations

Our concrete contractors will drill holes in the concrete slab in strategic locations in order to lift the slabs. Sometimes, holes are located in places you wouldn’t expect, and our Nashville concrete contractors know just where to drill in order to ensure that the void causing your concrete to crack is completely filled.

Pump Mixture

The team will then pump our special eco-friendly slurry grout through the holds to fill the voids underneath and lift the concrete slab until it is level. The concrete leveling occurs as pressure builds from the material being injected. It is a very precise method of lifting and must be stopped at the perfect time in order to ensure a level surface

Fill Holes

After the concrete floor has been leveled, the holes are filled, leaving you with a clean, level surface. Unlike a surface skim coat or concrete replacement, the surface can be used immediately after concrete floor leveling. 

A-1 Concrete Leveling and Foundation Repair – Nashville

Our team of concrete contractors provides concrete leveling services for customers across Nashville and the surrounding areas. While you can definitely attempt a concrete project on your own, we recommend hiring a professional to ensure that the job is done right. 

Along with concrete leveling, we also specialize in concrete pouring and foundation repair. Contact us today for a free quote.

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